Telling All the Right Reasons

Have you ever found yourself so frustrated over your current job that the first thing out of your mouth at an interview is about how unfair you were treated compared to another employee or something similar? You might want to consider the fact that you will not be receiving a call back or an interview. No one is assuming that you did not have an awful experience, it just is not exactly the first thing a prospective employer likes to hear. The small irritability that you held onto for such a long time grew over the two years you had to experience it on a daily basis. As such, there is probably something you will not like about your prospective job and your prospective boss does not want to hear that it might already bother you, during barely your first encounter.

Here are reasons you should be avoiding and others you should definitely consider using:

As you can tell, most of the green lit jobs are related to issues outside of your control. It’s highly likely that the red lit explanations will also happen without your expecting them to. The main difference is how you handled yourself in an unfortunate situation. If you want to be honest, it’s always a good idea to explain what you learned from the experience, mistakes you plan on never repeating again and how in this new company you will work your hardest to avoid them.

Everyone knows that you can be fired, be stuck somewhere underpaid or with some terrible coworkers. Just like you wouldn’t introduce yourself to a possible friend by telling them how terrible one of your last friends treated you, no one planning to build a lasting business relationship with you wants to be left with a bitter taste upon first meeting. As always, smile, be positive and explain how you plan on your past negatives to creative positives and you will undoubtedly ever again be in a red light situation.

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Amazing Skype Codec and New Cloud technology gets lost in iPhone 5 buzz

Mob mentality can be personified in the numbers of Chinese children taken out of school to make iPhones that Apple is expecting to sell to on launch day. When the government can state that the anticipated sale of iPhone 5 will single-handily boost the economy, despite loud cries of “don’t buy it” coming from Apple’s opposition, you know Tim Cook is keeping Steve Job’s business model of selling to a culture alive and well.

How about the business altering new Skype codec that is set to make your communication crisper and less choppy? Audio engineers at Skype teamed up with Xiph.Org to make CD quality audio that is intended for the internet. Even if you disregard Skype and video calls, if this kind of technology is successful, we would be looking at a whole new way of streaming music on the internet. Now that’s a business improvement that can put the world ahead again. So maybe dancing around an iPhone with a smaller plug in its bottom is not really worth our time anymore. What about updating your company to the cloud? As business people, we should move away from navel gazing at our phones and return to looking for innovation that can make our business move faster. It would also be a great change of pace for recent technological media.

I doubt that Andriod phones are made in a more educationally sound environment than Apple phones are. The keyboard on any OS before Andriod’s Ice Cream Sandwhich isn’t exactly the best. But I don’t even see the internet pointing that out anymore. But just about every article I have written about technology in the last month has been about my disappointment with Apple, and that’s not normally my top priority. Speculation about the new iPhone takes up a large portion of the internet about five months after the release of the previous model. And that considering the updates are not even that spectacular.

Here we are again, with model 5, which really has few noticeable changes from the 4S, considering its most popular feature Siri is still in beta. Again with the smaller, thinner, better, words being thrown around. The difference is that if parts of the previous phones were ‘revolutionary‘, the only ‘revolting’ aspect of the 5th model is the smaller charger and larger screen. Let’s call the new phone what it is, a leap to catch up to current Andriod phones. Instead of standing in line right now, let’s wait for the iPhone 5z (or G, S, X, really take your letter pick) to come out with an actual NEW and Revolutionary feature that will cause all of the competition to jump in and try to get ahead again. I have said it before: technology became lost when innovation stopped being a business model and culture turned into one.

Please, Please Just Email Me Back

There’s a pet peeve that office people quickly pick up and share across the border—people not answering emails. Like any other other relationship, the one between you and your recruiter or you and your financial advisor, etc relies on communication. We are all responsible for keeping it up. All that I ask is that you send an email. I can even disregard the fact that I don’t get responses to emails that say “please email me when you receive this.” I am talking about the people that do not show up and call or even send me a “hey I can’t make it” in the line of her email. You might not like the person you are communicating with, but just like it’s rude to ignore someone standing right next to you, calling out your name, it’s certainly rude to ignore their little envelope on your screen. Being rude really never gets you anywhere and might also gets a little note on your contact that says: “did not call.”

What to do and Why

           If you can’t be somewhere because you did not think you were a fit

Email saying: “I do not feel like this opportunity is a good fit for me. Please feel free to contact me/I will contact you in the future if need be.”

I understand I did not exactly resonate with you and that is OK, but let me know. If nothing else, I might reevaluate my approach. I am not going to harass you if you tell me that you would like to contact me next time you need my help. I do not like bothering people because that is not a good business practice. Plus, if you do not want to talk to me now, I know there’s a good chance you won’t change your mind in a week. I will give you space, promise.

          If you did not like the opportunity I had for you

Email me letting me know what you would prefer: “ I understand that you currently offer XYZ, and I do not feel like that would be the best fit for me, please feel free to contact me if ABC ever comes across your desk or if you know someone who can help.”

It’s a small world. Networking is key everywhere. With today’s unemployment rates and general financial gaps, chances are you will be running into the same people. You do not know if your next potential job has already employed someone who has heard your name and knows they do not want to deal with you. The label No Show, stays with you for a long time. Think about your encounters with people. Unfortunately, the bad ones stick sore in your memory longer than the good ones. If you do not give someone the tiny piece of respect that is communication, it won’t be quickly forgotten and your networking will definitely be hindered.

          Really, just send an email

Email is a really easy way to communicate. If you find that you get jittery making a call or  you have a tough time saying No, email gives you the perfect opportunity to do so without putting too much of your ego/confidence on the line. The bottom line is: if you ignore me, I will definitely ignore you. We leave in a world full of people. No one is 100% self sufficient. One simple act of kindness goes a long way. Letting someone who is working for you or with you on something know you are indisposed shows them his/her effort is still appreciated even though it’s not the right fit right now.